Monthly Archives: January 2019

Writing As Release

person uses pen on book

Photo by rawpixel.com on Pexels.com

Writing is a powerful way to release emotions. I’ve posted about this before, but this evening this really hit me.

I was writing down an idea for a devotional, when suddenly I started thinking of a friend who died last August. The catalyst for this was such a little thing: I have only a few more months left to pay on my car.  If my friend were still here, I know we could get together at a local restaurant and celebrate when the car is paid off, as we did for the closing on the sale of her father’s house, to settle his estate. Before I knew it, a wave of grief hit me and the tears began welling up in my eyes.

People who’ve experienced grief know this is the way it works: grief sneaks up on you days, months, even years after the person you cared for died. Grief doesn’t care where you are or what you are doing; it just hits you, and you need to deal with it.

I left off writing the devotional idea, turned to a new page in my notebook, and wrote, “Linette, I miss you! I only have a few months left until I get my car paid off and I know you would rejoice with me when that time comes…”  I wrote for about 15 minutes more, then the storm of grief abated, and I could continue with the idea for the devotional.

Although I’ve experienced the release that comes from writing, I’m still amazed that it happens. It’s a proven way to deal with strong emotions that blindside a person.

If you find yourself in the midst of grief, anger, fear, or any other emotions, try writing them out. You will find release and comfort in the act.

©P. Booher

 

2 Comments

Filed under Life Issues, Simple Ways to Handle Everyday Problems, Writing

Diving Into A Sea of Books–You’re Not Alone

divers-underwater-ocean-swim-68767.jpeg

Photo Credit: Pexels.com

As an avid reader, I get excited about the great number of books out there to read, either for entertainment, education, inspiration or with some books, all three. The quantity available in print, audio, and e-books reminds me of the vast amount of life in the oceans, so I call these book reviews “Diving Into A Sea of Books”. As with diving into an ocean looking for interesting objects, diving into books means you come across mixed results: over here, a book you don’t bother to finish, over there, a “treasure”–one that you like so much you can’t wait to reread it, and over there, a book you read and think, “Meh”.

You’re Not Alone, subtitled, Daily Encouragement For Those Looking For A New Job, by Richard Malone, is a helpful, useful book of meditations for those in the uncertain world of job changes. The book came about during the author’s own period of  unemployment when he looked for a devotional book and couldn’t find any.

Each day begins with Scripture, Mr. Malone’s writing, and then a short prayer. Mr. Malone points out that many of the people in the Bible dealt with a variety of situations that could bring on the powerful emotions a job loss carries with it–anger, fear, the desire for revenge, loneliness, and others. The author shows that God helped all those people, and He is more than willing to help people who’ve lost their jobs, for whatever reason.

At the back of the book Mr. Malone lists many books on the subject of work and handling emotions related to job loss.

Comments: This is the only book I’ve found so far which links unemployment and Scripture, and shows the help God offers through faith. While compassionate in tone to the job hunter, Mr. Malone also is realistic about factors that come into play in employment. He emphasizes that overall, no matter what, God is still here, and can be trusted. Given that a person cannot be sure of job “security”, this book is a valuable resource. To me, it’s a “treasure”. I want to start a job-search/support group in the future; this is one of the books I plan to use in the group.

©P. Booher

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Diving Into A Sea of Books, Faith Matters, Life Issues

Diving Into A Sea of Books–I Heard The Owl Call My Name

divers-underwater-ocean-swim-68767.jpeg

Photo Credit: Pexels.com

As an avid reader, I get excited about the great number of books out there to read, either for entertainment, education, inspiration or with some books, all three. The quantity available in print, audio, and e-books reminds me of the vast amount of life in the oceans, so I call these book reviews “Diving Into A Sea of Books”. As with diving into an ocean looking for interesting objects, diving into books means you come across mixed results: over here, a book you don’t bother to finish, over there, a “treasure”–one that you like so much you can’t wait to reread it, and over there, a book you read and think, “Meh”.

I Heard The Owl Call My Name by Margaret Craven is a slice-of-life novel about a young Anglican vicar, unaware he has a terminal illness, sent to a remote parish of Native American villages on the coast of British Columbia, Canada. The area is stunning in its natural beauty, but so remote that transportation–whether to get supplies in or people in or out–is via canoes, boats or seaplane–all subject to weather conditions.

The young priest commits himself to the task of ministering to the natives as he copes with loneliness, the insecurity of living in an unfamiliar culture, poor living conditions, and piloting a boat in the sometimes harsh weather and rough seas.

The villagers, who in the past sometimes dealt with priests who expected to be served rather than to serve, are polite but not friendly. They learn Mark is different from previous vicars as he helps the people any way he can, stands up for the needs of the tribe, attempts to learn the unwritten language, and respects the native traditions and beliefs, even though he doesn’t understand or agree with them.

As Mark rejoices with the people in their good times and suffers with them through their losses, bonds of deep affection grow until he becomes as one of them. When it’s time for the vicar to leave, the villagers ask the Bishop to allow Mark to stay.

Comments: I reread this book a few weeks ago. It’s one I don’t really want to give away. Without being “preachy” the novel shows commitment, humility, and giving oneself in service to others. For me, this book is a “treasure”.

©P. Booher

4 Comments

Filed under Diving Into A Sea of Books

A Joyful New Year

accuracy afternoon alarm clock analogue

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

I’m breaking with tradition: I’m wishing you a Joyful New Year, rather than a Happy New Year. Why?

I read somewhere that happiness is dependent upon circumstances, but joy is not. Joy can be found in less-than-good situations, and joy is deeper and richer than happiness.

I want to make this a year in which I emphasize joy, instead of happiness.

(Yes, I’m aware I’m a day late posting this–actually two days late, for those living on the other side of the Date Line. A cold ambushed me several days ago, and yesterday I was feeling its effects, what with an energy level that went up, and then down. Still, I’m feeling much better than I could be, and for that, I’m grateful.)

Have a Joyful New Year!

©P. Booher

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Country Ripples